The truth behind Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Star Wars: The Force Awakens is an epic space opera based on the characters created by George Lucas. It is the seventh episode in the main star wars Film series, and was released on December 18, 2015. Co-produced, co-written and directed by J.J Abrams, The Force Awakens is the first movie in the Sequel Trilogy, and the other two sequels are scheduled for release in 2017 and 2019. The producers of the movie are Kathleen Kennedy and Bryan Burk along with Abrams. The movie is circulated worldwide by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures.

The storyline gave an impression that the Star Wars was finally over in the year 2005. But in the year 2012, a $4.05 billion deal was struck by Disney to buy Lucasfilm. Along with it came the announcement of the production of a whole new trilogy series of Star Wars. The Force Awakens was released roughly a decade since the premiere of the last major installment, Star Wars Episode 3: Revenge of the Sith.

Storyline

The movie continues right from where the last installment ended, the destruction of the second Death Star. Now, after almost 30 years of disappearance of Luke Skywalker, the last Jedi, the First Order comes into the power wanting to eliminate the Republic. Leia Organa, who has still not given up on her brother, leads the resistance which opposes the First Order while searching for Luke.

Daisy Ridley is Rey in the Force Awakens

Daisy Ridley is Rey in the Force Awakens

In the search of Luke, Poe Dameron goes to the planet of Jakku, but instead ends up getting captured by the Stormtroopers. But during all this, Poe’s droid BB-8 successfully escapes and reaches Rey. Meanwhile, Ren also comes to know of BB-8. With the help of a Stormtrooper FN-2187, Poe finally escapes in a stolen TIE fighter, and meets Finn. However, their stolen fighter craft crashes on Jakku, leaving behind Finn as the sole survivor. Finn runs and finally meets Rey and BB-8, where they are attacked by the First order. The three of them then run away from the planet in a stolen ship.

Soon their ship gets destroyed where they get the much needed help from Han and Chewbacca. It is now that Rey learns about the reason behind Luke’s exile. While the First order again tries to interfere and destroy them, Rey comes across the lightsaber that had belonged to Luke and his family for generations. After encountering a disturbing vision, Rey escapes into the woods and Finn is now entrusted with the responsibility of safekeeping of the lightsaber.

The First Order uses their superweapon to demolish the Republic capital, bringing them to an end. Ron is told to kill his father, Han because of his involvement with Rey. The First Order attacks Han and his partners, but they succeed in escaping unharmed with the help of the light saber. Rey is captured by Ren, but she could not be defeated by Ren and uses a Jedi mind trick to get out of there.

Han Solo makes an appearance, but his fate is unexpected

Han Solo makes an appearance, but his fate is unexpected

Finn, Chewbacca, BB-8 and Han reach the Resistance base and meet Leia there. A war breaks between the Resistance Base and the Starkiller base, in which Han loses his life. The war ends with Ren getting called back to the enemy camp. Resistance base celebrates their victory while some of them also mourn over Han’s death. Finally the pieces of the lost map are brought together. Rey encounters Luke in the last few minutes of the movie and offers him the lightsaber.

Cast

Luke Skywalker, is portrayed by the American actor, producer, writer and director Mark Richard Hamill. Though Luke only appears at the end of the movie, his character still holds great significance to the storyline not only in the previous Star Wars series as well as in the upcoming two episodes of the current series.

Luke’s Sister, General Leia Organa is played by Carrie Fisher. She is one princess that turned into a General. She is portrayed as a defeated person who is tired and disturbed under the immense pressure brought upon her shoulders.
Rey, the self-sufficient, force-sensitive scavenger is played by English actress Daisy Jazz Isobel Ridley. Rey is one of the bravest female characters in the series who gains strength from the difficult situations and comes out stronger than she was ever before. Her adventure begins after meeting Finn.

The special effects of the movie are breathtaking

The special effects of the movie are breathtaking

Finn is a ransomed First order Stormtrooper, brought into light by John Boyega. The character of Finn is the most interesting of all. He was found as a boy, who falls into dangerous situations and it is his reaction to danger that changes the course of his entire life. His life is unique in a certain way which intrigues the viewers about him.
Han Solo is played by the famous actor-producer Harrison Ford. The character of Han develops with the series. Often seen as emotional, Han is the character with a wealth of knowledge and street-smartness. He is killed by his own son Ren in the seventh episode of the series.

Kylo Ren, the son of Han Solo is portrayed by the American actor Adam Driver. He is a dark warrior, often seen as unpredictable, stubborn and dangerous. His inner conflict can be clearly seen in his last encounter with his father.
Other than this there are many characters that play important roles in the movie such as Poe Dameron (Oscar Isaac), Maz Kanata (Lupita Nyong’o), Snoke (Andy Serkis), General Hux (Domhall Gleeson), Chewbacca (Peter Mayhew) and many more.

Achievements

Adam Driver is Kylo Ren in the Force Awakens

Adam Driver is Kylo Ren in the Force Awakens

The Force Awakens has received an overwhelmingly positive response from the critics as well as the audiences. Right from the announcement of the production, the movie was most awaited by the die-hard fans. It did total justice to its fan club with an amazing script, actors and production quality. Since day one of the release, the movie has been a record breaker. It has already grossed $610.8 million against a budget of $200 million. The movie was released in almost 30,000 screens in 12 different international markets. The commercial success of the movie is just one of the factors to be focused on.

Though it has not been many days since the premiere of the movie, it has already become the winner of the AFI Award, 2015. The movie has also been nominated for the Critics’ Choice Movie Awards and Florida Film Critics Circle Awards, decisions on which are still pending. To see The Force Awakens on cable TV, check out one of these awesome TV packages.

This Syfy is Deadly: Lost Girl

Lost Girl is a Canadian series which originally aired on the Canadian channel Showcase. It eventually premiered on international channels, including the Australian, British and American versions of the SyFy Channel.

The series is considered to be a supernatural drama, and originally premiered in Canada on September 12th, 2010. The show continued for a total of five seasons; before the fifth season premiere in August of 2014, the network Showcase announced to fans that the fifth season would be the final season for the show, although the network did decide to order 16 total episodes in place of the regular 13 episode order for the last season.

Since its premiere, Lost Girl has earned generally favorable reviews, particularly from critics who specialize in science fiction, supernatural and niche genre TV shows. The show was generally considered a success due to good ratings and a positive response from fans. The success of the show has even led to the rumor that a spin-off series was in the works, but as of the fall of 2015, Showcase has neither confirmed nor denied these rumors.

Whether you’re a major Lost Girl fan or are just now catching onto this supernatural drama, consider the following essential guide to Lost Girl.

The Premise

Anna Silk is Bo

Anna Silk is Bo

The premise of Lost Girl is as follows: Bo is an otherworldly succubus from the Fae world, who was unknowingly adopted by a human family who was unaware of her true nature. Bo did not realize that there was anything different about her, either, until she entered puberty and accidentally killed her boyfriend by draining his life force during their first intimate moment. After the accidental killing, Bo found out she was adopted and discovered more about her true origins; she decided to run away, living instead with no real identity on the run.

Bo eventually meets and saves a human woman from a sexual assault, and the two team up to form a detective agency geared towards human and Fae interaction. Meanwhile, Bo discovers that there is more to the world of Fae than she originally thought—and it’s not always safe.

The Cast

Ksenia Solo is Kenzi

Ksenia Solo is Kenzi

The show stars Anna Silk as Bo Dennis, the main character and succubus who discovers her unearthly powers when she accidentally kills her boyfriend. Bo wants to learn more about her true nature, her powers, and how–or if–she can control them. In addition to her role in Lost Girl, Anna Silk has starred in several commercials, had a reoccurring role in Being Erica, and has had several small film roles.

The show also features Kris Holden-Ried as Dyson, a wolf-shapeshifter who works as a homicide detective and uses his wolf powers to solve crimes. He is ordered to keep an eye on Bo, but their relationship begins to take a serious turn when he realizes that Bo is not the monster others believe she is.

Ksenia Solo appears as Mackenzie Malikov, better known as Kenzi; Kenzi is the human woman that Bo saves, and the two become fast friends. Kenzi hides under the cover of being Bo’s “property “when they are in the presence of people from the Fae world, since human-Fae interaction is generally forbidden with the exception of Fae who own humans that do their bidding.

The show also features Zoie Palmer as Dr. Lauren Lewis; Rick Howland as Fitzpatrick McCorrigan; K.C. Collins as Hale Santiago; Paul Amos as Vex; Inga Cadranel as Aife; Emannuelle Vaugier as Evony; Kate Trotter as Norn; Aron Tager as Mayer; Anthony Lemke as Ryan Lambert; Athena Karkanis as Nadia; Raoul Rujillo as Garuda; and Deborah Odell as Stella Nashira.

The Creative Team

Zoie Palmer is Lauren

Zoie Palmer is Lauren

Lost Girl was created by Michelle Lovretta; the show is Lovretta’s only major work to date. Jay Firestone joined the project as an executive producer early on. Firestone has been involved in numerous films and TV shows over the years, including: Rules of Engagement, Relic Hunter, Mutant X, Andromeda, Dark Matter, and Rat Race.

Other producers include Peter Mohan, who was an executive producer for season 2; Grant Rosenberg, who was a co-executive producer for season 2; Emily Andras, who was an executive producer for seasons three and four; and Michael Grassi, who was the executive preorder for season 5.

Ratings and Reception

K C Collins is Hale

K C Collins is Hale

The initial reception to Lost Girl was mixed but generally favorable. Most early critics called the show “enjoyable,” “watchable,” and “fun.” Some of the more notable favorable reviews note that the character of Bo was exceptionally well-written, particularly within the genre of supernatural or science fiction television. Some of the criticism aimed at the show noted that the special effects and budget were on the lower end, although this may have been the reason that the series ended up being shown internationally, as the lower cost for filming translated into lower licensing fees from the executive producers.

Another point of criticism was aimed not at the show itself, but the American SyFy channel for editing out 90 seconds from each episode in order to fit in more commercials. In addition to this editing taking away scenes for American viewers, the specific scenes removed—namely, scenes depicting more explicitly romantic scenes between the lesbian characters in the show, which appeared to have been cut out of the series for their more explicit LGBT  content. Although the official Lost Girl creative team claimed that they edits were purely done for time and not specifically due to their content, many fans noted that it could not have been a coincidence that the cuts almost always seemed to occur during those scenes and not intimate scenes between the heterosexual couples and characters.

The ratings for the show are difficult to measure due to the Canadian viewer count system. By most accounts, the viewer ratings tended to go in between 200,000 and 400,000 per episode for the first season. The show’s second and third season had higher ratings, although the exact numbers are unknown. The ratings for the show’s international airings are currently not available. To watch Syfy, sign up for an amazing XFINITY cable package today.

Is Homeland really about prisoners of war?

Homeland, which airs on the Showtime network, is a political thriller drama which stars Claire Danes and Damian Lewis. The series originally premiered in 2011 and continued with a fifth season in the fall of 2015; there is no word as of yet on whether or not Showtime will renew the series for a sixth season, although fans of the show consider it likely due to the continued critical reception and good ratings for the series.

Homeland is actually somewhat of a remake. It is directly based on an Israeli political drama called Hatufim, which loosely translated means Prisoners of War. The show was actually purchased by 20th Century Fox before a single episode of the original show aired in Israel, and the American adaptation was put into works immediately.

Over the course of its several year run, Homeland has gathered a considerable fan base. Whether you’re a longtime fan of the series or someone new who has just been introduced, consider the following essential guide to Homeland.

The Premise

Mandy Patinkin is 'Saul Patinkin'

Mandy Patinkin is ‘Saul Patinkin’

The basic premise of Homeland is as follows: Carrie Mathison is a CIA officer who is reassigned after she disobeys orders while working in the field in Iraq. During her time in Iraq, she uncovered sensitive information regarding an American prisoner of war who was turned into a spy by al-Qaeda. Her new job at a center for Counterterrorism measures leads her into conflict when she is informed of an American prisoner of war who was recovered during a mission–a prisoner named Nicholas Brody, whom Mathison believes is the prisoner-turned-al-Qaeda spy.

Mathison is not able to go to any of her superiors with her suspicions due to her controversial standing with the CIA, and she must uncover for herself whether or not Brody is a spy—all while working with him to counteract terrorism.

The Cast

F Murray Abraham is 'Dar Adal'

F Murray Abraham is ‘Dar Adal’

The show stars Claire Danes in the lead role of Carrie Mathison, the CIA officer given new case assignment; Danes’ character also has bipolar disorder, and Danes did some significant research into the disorder in order to authentically and sensitively portray a character with bipolar disorder.

The show also stars Damian Lewis as Nicholas Brody; the retired U.S. Marine Sergeant who Danes’ character believes may be turned by al-Qaeda. Brody’s character was held as a prisoner of war eight years, which regardless of the truth of Mathison’s accusations, is bound to change a man.

The show also features other notable actors in the main cast, including but not limited to: Mandy Pantinkin as Saul Berenson, Mathison’s mentor; Morena Baccarin as Jessica Brody, Brody’s wife; David Harewood as David Estes, the director of the CIA Counter-terrorism center; Diego Klattenhoff as Mike Faber, Brody’s best friend who begins a relationship with his wife after he is presumed dead; and David Marcino as Virgil, a former CIA employee hired by Mathison to keep tabs on Brody.

The Creative Team

The show was developed by Howard Gordon and Alex Gansa; Gansa’s other work includes scripts for the Beauty and the Beast TV series, The X-Files, Dawson’s Creek, and Numb3ers. Gordon’s previous work includes Tyrant, Awake, and the upcoming Frankenstein TV series on NBC.

The show has numerous executive producers; aside from Gansa and Gordon, its executive producers include Michael Cuesta, Henry Bromell, Alexander Cary, Chip Johannensen, Meredith Stiehm and Lesil Linka Glatter.

Like most TV shows, Homeland has featured numerous directors. Some of the more notable directors include: David Nutter, Seith Mann, Jeffrey Reiner, Daniel Minahan, and Jeremy Podeswa. Some of the show’s executive producers, including Leslie Linka Glatter and Michael Cuesta, have also served as directors on the show.

Reception and Ratings

The show’s reception has tended to vary from season to season. The first season was almost universally acclaimed, and ended up receiving a 92 out of 100 rating on Metacritic. The show was even named the “best show of 2011” by TV Guide, which was considered a great accomplishment due to the numerous high quality shows that premiered that year. The second season of Homeland also earned almost complete acclaim; it even earned a higher rating on Metacritic than the first season, with 96 out of 100. However, since the show’s third season, critical reception has gone down. In one particularly critical review of the third season, Robert Rorke (New York Post) remarked that “seldom in the history of cable TV has a series imploded so quickly as Showtime’s Homeland … the show … is now impossible to take seriously.”

Despite the falling critical performance, the ratings for Homeland have remained fairly steady. The premiere of season 1 earned 1 million total viewers, with the finale earning 1.71 million viewers. The premiere of season 2 earned 1.73 million viewers, while the finale for that season earned 2.29 million viewers. The first episode of season 3 earned 1.88 million viewers, while the finale saw a total of 2.38 million viewers. The fourth season premiere earned 1.61 million viewers, while the finale got a total of 1.92 million viewers. The premiere of the fifth and latest season earned 1.66 million viewers, slightly up from the previous year.

Trivia

Claire Danes is 'Carrie Mathison'

Claire Danes is ‘Carrie Mathison’

There are a lot of interesting factoids to take in about Homeland. The following are just a few interesting trivia pieces:

  • In the original scripts, Carrie’s name was actually Claire. However, once Claire Danes was cast in the role, her name was changed to Carrie. Claire Danes also talked with the showrunners about involving bipolar disorder into the show due to her interest in showcasing a protagonist with that disorder.
  • Halle Barry was originally considered for the role of Carrie/Claire. However, it is speculated that she did not want to commit to an open-ended television series.
  • Damian Lewis didn’t need to audition for the role. Howard Gordon and Alex Gansa saw Lewis in the film Keane, loved his performance, and offered him the role over the phone.
  • There was a unique item on the budget for season 2: the cost of digitally erasing or disgusting Claire Danes’ pregnant belly from numerous shots, due to the fact that the actress became visibly pregnant during filming.

Homeland airs on Showtime, which you can watch with a Comcast TV package.

Most Controversial American Horror Story Moments

American Horror Story is not a show for the faint of heart—or the weak hearted. Since the show’s first season, it has featured many disturbing, shocking and of course, horrifying themes and moments. Of course, it’s not exactly unusual for a show based around the horror genre to contain horror elements; but American Horror Story has frequently pushed the boundaries of what is acceptable on television nor even acceptable in the film or television medium itself. In some cases, these boundary pushing moments have resulted in controversy. Let’s take a look at some of the most controversial moments in American Horror Story, from season one to the show’s current Hotel incarnation.

Freak Show: Penny’s Mutilation

For most of her screen time, it didn’t seem like the character of Penny would really go anywhere—she fell in love with the thrills of the freak show and eventually had a fling with Paul, the so-called “Seal Man.” However, it quickly became clear that the ‘fling’ between Paul and Penny was anything but: Penny fell in love with Paul, which didn’t sit very well with her conservative, controlling father. When Penny revealed that she was in love with Paul and the freak show, she decided to leave him—but not before he got some very twisted revenge.

Penny The Astounding Lizard Girl played by Grace Gummer

Penny The Astounding Lizard Girl played by Grace Gummer

To teach his daughter a lesson, he had her drugged; and then paid a body modification artist to tattoo almost her entire body, including her face, in addition to forking her tongue and adding aesthetic bumps to her face to make her look like a lizard or a snake. The reveal was shocking and disturbing, not just because it was a visual shock but because Penny was forcibly mutilated by her own father, and her horrified reaction spoke both of visual horror and mental betrayal.

Hotel: The ‘Addiction Demon’ scene

Addiction Demon played by Alexander Ward

Addiction Demon played by Alexander Ward

The ‘Addiction Demon’ is a strange creature which lives in the hotel and preys on people with addictions, particularly drug addictions. He makes his first, though likely not only, appearance in a scene with a young drug addicts who books a room at the hotel in order to enjoy his latest score. The demon attacks him, however, and brutally assaults him with a drill-shaped phallus. Although the scene lasted only minutes for viewers, in the context of the show the assault lasted for hours for the victim character—making it one of the most shocking and violent assault scenes featured in the show so far.  There is no word yet on whether or not the ‘Addiction Demon’ will be making another appearance during the Hotel season, but some fans are crossing their fingers that he will stay hidden.

Murder House: The Montgomery Baby

The Montgomery Baby

The Montgomery Baby

Doctor Montgomery was an ordinary doctor–who secretly performed illegal abortions for women, particularly abortions on women who were far along in their pregnancy.  Eventually, the husband of one of his patients decided to get revenge on Doctor Montgomery and kidnapped Montgomery’s infant—only to return him to his parents, dead, piece by piece. Doctor Montgomery, in his grief and madness, tried to rebuild his child using the pieces of his dead infant and other leftover material from his laboratory. The result was a living, breathing monster that now haunts the basement of the Murder House. Although the physical appearance of the ‘reborn’ monster child is disturbing, most fans found the tragic, ghoulish fate of the innocent Montgomery infant far more shocking and difficult to watch.

Freak Show: Elsa Mars’ Back Story

Elsa Mars portrayed by Jessica Lange

Elsa Mars portrayed by Jessica Lange

Elsa Mars, the owner and headliner of the freak show, appeared to be nothing more than an older, jaded woman with some singing talent and a penchant for hogging the spotlight. She participated in the freak show without actually appearing to be a “freak,” at least until the big reveal. Her backstory, explored in the episode where Edward Mordrake is summoned on Halloween, revealed something more tragic—and controversial—about Elsa Mars. During the flashback to her backstory, it was revealed that Elsa became a popular dominatrix in Weimar Germany after she realized it could make her money. Unfortunately, her fame had a downside: she was ‘booked’ by a client who later drugged her and mutilated her, leaving her for dead—all while filming the events for a snuff film. Obviously, Elsa was saved; but she lost both her legs in the process, and can now only walk using wooden prosthetic legs which she keeps hidden at all times. The scene where Elsa’s legs are cut off was fairly brutal, even for American Horror Story standards, which left many fans feeling squeamish.

Asylum: Pretty Much Anything Dr. Arden Did

Dr. Arden was easily the most twisted character in the Asylum season—and for a season that included the Devil, a serial killer with mommy issues, and impregnating aliens, that’s pretty twisted. Over the season, it became clear that Dr. Arden was more than a sketchy doctor working in an insane asylum. He conducted gruesome experiments on people, all former inmates who were sentenced to solitary confinement, to turn them into mutant creatures. Viewers got a clear glimpse of what he could do during his experiments when he kidnapped, tortured and mutilated Shelley; in the end, the Monsignor killed her due to her suffering—and of course, to save his own skin.

Dr Arden takes advantage of Lana

Dr Arden takes advantage of Lana

But Dr. Arden’s actions didn’t stop at terrible experiments: it was later revealed that he was actually a former Nazi who worked in a concentration camp, brutally choosing who would live and die and then performing experiments on many of those he selected.

At the behest of Sister Mary Eunice—now possessed—he set up Sister Jude and had her committed to the asylum as a patient. He even participated in Jude’s forced electroshock therapy, which left in her a state of confusion.

Dr. Arden eventually realized that the Sister Mary Eunice he knew and loved had died, and when the Monsignor killed her—and the demon inside her body—he crawled into the furnace with her body and burned himself alive. To scare yourself with American Horror Story on FX, sign up for a cable television subscription today.

Fairy Tales and Classic Stories Perfect for ‘Grimm’

The premise of NBC’s Grimm is steeped in fairy tales and folklore; in the series, the titular ‘Grimm’ is a huntsman of sorts who is responsible for stopping all sorts of ‘Wesen,’ creatures who resemble various fairy tale and folklore characters and creatures who have been passed down over the centuries.

Naturally, the show has featured all sorts of fairy tale, folklore and other classic story elements over the course of its several seasons. Some of the most notable include elements from Little Red Riding Hood, The Little Mermaid, Snow White Peter Pan, and even ghost stories like the Spanish tale of The Weeping Woman, which was used for  a particularly creepy and haunting Halloween episode of Grimm.

Adalind Grimm

Adalind Grimm

However, due to the nature of the show, the fairy tale elements are rarely directly adapted from the tales themselves—instead, fairy tale elements are woven into the series in a more natural way. For example, in the episode that borrowed elements from Little Red Riding Hood, a Blutbaden (or wolf) character was kidnapping young girls who wore red coats or capes, just like the fairy tale character of Red Riding Hood. In the episode that featured elements from The Little Mermaid, an aquatic Wesen who fell in love with a human was included.

The show has featured many different fairy tales and other classic stories in the past few years, but there are still many more that could make for very interesting additions to the show. Let’s take a look some of the best fairy tales and classic stories that would be perfect for Grimm.

The 12 Dancing Princesses

Grimm Shared Spaces

Grimm Shared Spaces

In the 12 Dancing Princesses, a group of—you guessed it—12 princesses are under a curse to dance every single night. The curse is eventually broken, but not before the princesses find themselves constantly exhausted from night after night of dancing.

This particular fairy tale could work on Grimm in many different ways. It could be something more literal, such as a Wesen who kidnaps humans and forces them to dance for amusement or perhaps some sort of life-sucking ritual; it could be something of a virus or disease, such as a Wesen disease that makes people dance until they die. Or, it could be adapted in a less literal way, as Grimm has often done in the past; for example, Nick and company could be called in to work on a case where 12 young women have been kidnapped by a slave ring.

The Snow Queen

From the Unfair Fight Scene in Grimm

From the Unfair Fight Scene in Grimm

The Snow Queen, which was originally penned by Hans Christen Anderson, would make a very interesting fairy tale for Grimm to tackle. In the original tale, the Snow Queen is an evil queen who has a magic mirror imbued with dark magic; shards from this mirror get into the eyes of a young boy, turning him dark and cold, and it is up to his young friend Gerda to save him. Along the way, Gerda meets queens and princesses of other seasons, who help—or hinder—her journey.

If this particular tale were featured on Grimm, it would probably need to be a less literal adaptation of the tale. It could be a Wesen who has ice powers similar to those described in The Snow Queen; perhaps he (or she) could freeze hearts, turning them—quite literally—cold. Or the show could introduce another Wesen object: a mirror that, like the mirror in the Snow Queen tale, turns a person’s heart dark and cold.

The Princess and The Goblin

David Giuntoli as Nick Bukhardt

David Giuntoli as Nick Bukhardt

This classic story has all of the elements of a fairy tale. In the original story, written by George MacDonald, a young princess befriends a young miner who tells her stories about the goblins who live in the caves underneath the kingdom. The goblins, who had once lived above ground, were harsh, cruel creatures who resented human beings because they got to live in the light. The goblins plan a takeover of the human world, with their first aim being to kidnap the young princess and make her one of them.

This story has Grimm written all over it, with the most obvious adaptation being to introduce Wesen similar to the Goblins in the story: harsh, mean, hard creatures who resent people for getting to live above ground. They could even have the one weakness of the Goblins in the novels: soft feet, which when trampled on puts them into a state of complete agony.

The Light Princess

The Light Princess is another fairy tale story by George MacDonald. In this tale, a young infant princess is cursed with the gift of “lightness,” both literal and figurative. She is unable to take anything—even the death of people—seriously, and constantly laughs and makes games of everything. She is also literally light; without specially crafted weighted belts, she floats in the air, too light to keep herself on the ground. A young man falls in love with the princess, despite her lightness, and ultimately breaks her curse after she grieves for the man’s apparent death.

The Light Princess could make for a very unique type of Wesen story in Grimm. One direction the show could take the story is for the Wesen, like other Wesen featured in the show, to be hindered by their own Wesen nature; a “light princess” Wesen could accidentally bring harm to others or themselves through no fault of their own. It could be up to Nick and company to find a way to help this Wesen while stopping them from hurting themselves or others.

Another direction the show could take is similar to other cases in the past where either a Wesen’s powers (either direct or through a magic potion of some kind) or a disease causes them to change personality. A Hexenbiest potion, for example, could make the characters undergo the same personality transformation as the princess in the story—cursed with lightness, which would make it difficult for any of the show’s main characters to get anything done! When you purchase a cable television plan, you can binge Grimm on NBC!